Remix, Reuse, Recycle Project

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At first I thought I liked popcorn, but man oh man I now feel like it is a dreaded word that I never want to hear again.

For this assignment we were asked to make and remix images, video and sound clips from the Internet into Mozilla Popcorn.  To be honest I felt a little apprehensive about this task.  I really seem to have trouble grasping and using new programs. In order to prepare myself for this task, I watched a TED talk by Dale Dougherty about pushing our children to become a generation of makers.  I will be honest, I am a little hesitant to be a maker, I feel that I am more of a doer.  But from watching this clip, I can see the importance of being a maker.  We want children to explore their creativity and to be able to take their creativity and do something productive with it.  What a concept huh?  So I guess the idea of lecture, worksheet and then test is going to be “tested” in this course.  Is that not exciting?  By focusing on helping children become makers, we are actually helping them find their niche in the world.

Next I read an excerpt from the book  Remix: Making art and commerce thrive in the hybrid economy by Lawrence Lessig.  This read was truly an eye opener.  I never thought that “remixing” could be such a heated topic.  I think back to all of the times I have sent videos of my kids dancing to a song, or posted a picture from a museum to my Facebook page. Has our society become so money hungry that we can no longer enjoy a song, a painting, a picture and share it without fearing a lawsuit?  The author states that through remixing,  “we should learn something from it— about us, and about the nature of creativity. (Lessig, 2008, p.19).  What a great idea.  So with a new understanding of the idea of remixing, I dove into popcorn maker.  Little did I know this adventure would be one that would make me pretty angry.

I decided to remix “blended learning” for my project.  Blended learning has always been something that I believe will help students to become more successful in any classroom setting.  So I followed the directions and got started.  To my surprise the creation of the video was quite easy.  I was able to find videos and images that were all covered under the creative commons license.  However, I struggled greatly to get any sound to connect to my remix.  I tried and tried and I could not get anything to load (I think I spent 60 minutes just playing with SoundCloud).  It was beyond frustrating.  Eventually I had to give up before I threw my computer across the room :).

I was able to complete my remix, though I was a little disappointed in the video.  I felt it was too plain.  I wanted to wow everyone with my creativity, but instead I feel my video was mediocre at best.  I believe this tool would be great for a classroom setting.  Though I wonder if firewalls could create a headache for teachers wanting to create remixes in school?  I believe tools like this are the future.  I just wish they were a little more user friendly.

Please enjoy my first, but not last remix.

Popcorn Remix Video

References for blog post:

Lessig, L. (2008). Remix: Making art and commerce thrive in the hybrid economy. Penguin Press.

References for Remix:

Flickinger B.  [Photographer].  Student_ipad_school – 031[Online image].  (2012). Retrieved on July 5, 2013, from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/56155476@N08/6659996469/

Fryer W. [Photographer].  Wordle of Powerful Ingredients 4 Blended Learning [online image].  (2010).  Retrieved on July 5, 2013, from:http://www.flickr.com/photos/wfryer/4896957792/

Higgin M. [Photographer].  VCCI0002.jpg [Online image].  (2009).  Retrieved on July 5, 2013 from: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:VCCI0002.jpg

NAUelearning (2013, February 19). Ellen Larson on Blended Learning .  Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6o6b-h9GaU

24x7learning.com. (2011).  Blended learning methodology [graphic].  Retreived July 5, 2013 from: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Blended-learning-methodolog.jpg

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