Choose Your Own Adventure

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For this week’s assignment we were asked to find 5 articles on a topic that directly relates to our teaching.  I decided to research high interest reading.  This topic is very relevant to my teaching because I am going to be teaching 7th and 8th grade English this year, and I believe high interest readings will be the key to my success.  The articles I read are below.

Seek the unknown for Teen Read Week 2013: using action research to determine recreational reading habits of high school students

This article came from the perspective of a high school librarian.  The article discussed how librarians can survey students to gain a better understanding of what kinds of reading would most interest students.  This survey would help guide the librarians in preparation for Teen Read Week.  I felt the idea of surveying students to find out their comfort level with reading was an excellent idea, not just for librarians but also for teachers.

Lewis, C.  (2013).  Seek the unknown for Teen Read Week 2013: using action research to determine recreational reading habits of high school students.    Young Adult Library Services, 11(4), 9.

Using high-interest materials to engage secondary students in reading

This article discusses the importance of triggering students interest while they are reading.  When students are not interested in their reading they do not do as well in school.  When students found interest in what the teacher presented in class, they actually began reading more on their own.

Mulholland, R. (2002).  Using high-interest materials to engage secondary students in reading.  Reading Online 6(3).  Retrieved from: http://www.readingonline.org/articles/art_index.asp?HREF=mulholland/index.html

Can Reading Be Saved

This article discusses how educational strategies have created this beast (non-readers) in the classroom.  Students ave been forced to read materials that they are not interested in, and see no purpose.  Because of this, the idea of pleasure reading has fallen to the way side.  In the article, the author interviews Kelly Gallagher.  Gallagher says that teachers need to surround students will high interest reading all of the time.  I like this article because I want my students to enjoy reading as much as I do.

Rebora, A.  (2011).  Can Reading Be Saved?  Education Week Teacher PD Source book, 4(2), 22.

Eleven Was to Engage Reluctant Readers

This article gives great tips to teachers to promote pleasure reading in their classroom.  Some of the ideas that stood out to me are to promote good books and provide interventions.  This article is a very easy read, and the ideas are easy enough to implement.

Spencer, J.  (2012, March 17).  Eleven Was to Engage Reluctant Readers [web log comment].  Retrieved from: http://www.educationrethink.com/2012/03/eleven-ways-to-engage-reluctant-readers.html

10 questions about independent reading:  reading expert Jennifer Serravallo answers your tough questions on how to make the most of independent time

This article gives the reader many suggestions o help establish an independent reading program in their classes/schools.  Suggestions include incorporating more reading time into the daily curriculum and allowing students to have more control over the books they choose.

Truby, D.  (2012).  10 questions about independent reading:  reading expert Jennifer Serravallo answers your tough questions on how to make the most of independent time.    Instructor, 122(2), 29.

To assist e in my search I contacted the librarian at MSU.  The questions I asked were:

1.  Where is the best place to locate free scholarly journals dealing with high interest reading?

2.  How do I know which articles/authors are most reputable?

3.  Are there any authors/journals I should focus the majority of my research on?

The librarian was very helpful.  Her advice made the search process very easy.  The best piece of advice she gave me was o go to the following website: http://libguides.lib.msu.edu/edjournals

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